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(W)  Henderson, KY      
(P)  Lake Ann, MI      
(S)  Bowie, MD      
Bowie, MD(13th)
Henderson, KY(60th)

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Index= 20 Title=Medicare and Retirement Medicare and Retirement Medicare is a national social insurance program, administered by the U.S. federal government since 1965, that guarantees access to health insurance for Americans ages 65 and older and younger people with disabilities as well as people with end stage renal disease. As a social insurance program, Medicare spreads the financial risk associated with illness across society to protect everyone, and thus has a somewhat different social role from for-profit private insurers, which manage their risk portfolio to maximize profitability by denying coverage to those they anticipate will need it.[1] In 2008, the US Federal Goverment spent 391,266,000,000 dollars on Medicare.[2] Medicare offers all enrollees a defined benefit. Hospital care is covered under Part A and outpatient medical services are covered under Part B. To cover the Part A and Part B benefits, Medicare offers a choice between an open-network single payer health care plan (traditional Medicare) and a network plan (Medicare Advantage, or Medicare Part C), where the federal government pays for private health coverage. A majority of Medicare enrollees have traditional Medicare (76 percent) over a Medicare Advantage plan (24 percent). Medicare Part D covers outpatient prescription drugs exclusively through private plans, either standalone prescription drug plans or through Medicare Advantage plans that offer prescription drugs In 2010, Medicare provided health insurance to 48 million Americans—40 million people age 65 and older and eight million younger people with disabilities. Medicare serves a large population of old, sick, and low-income people. On average, Medicare covers about half (48 percent) of health care costs for enrollees. Medicare enrollees must cover the rest of the cost. These out-of-pocket costs vary depending on the amount of health care a Medicare enrollee needs. They might include uncovered services—such as long-term, dental, hearing, and vision care—and supplemental insurance.[3] In general, all persons 65 years of age or older who have been legal residents of the United States for at least 5 years are eligible for Medicare. People with disabilities under 65 may also be eligible if they receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. Specific medical conditions may also help people become eligible to enroll in Medicare. People qualify for Medicare coverage, and Medicare Part A premiums are entirely waived, if the following circumstances apply: They are 65 years or older and U.S. citizens or have been permanent legal residents for 5 continuous years, and they or their spouse has paid Medicare taxes for at least 10 years. or They are under 65, disabled, and have been receiving either Social Security SSDI benefits or Railroad Retirement Board disability benefits; they must receive one of these benefits for at least 24 months from date of entitlement (first disability payment) before becoming eligible to enroll in Medicare. or They get continuing dialysis for end stage renal disease or need a kidney transplant. or They are eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance and have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease). Those who are 65 and older must pay a monthly premium to remain enrolled in Medicare Part A if they or their spouse have not paid Medicare taxes over the course of 10 years while working.[20] People with disabilities who receive SSDI are eligible for Medicare while they continue to receive SSDI payments; they lose eligibility for Medicare based on disability if they stop receiving SSDI. The 24 month exclusion means that people who become disabled must wait 2 years before receiving government medical insurance, unless they have one of the listed diseases . Some beneficiaries are dual-eligible. This means they qualify for both Medicare and Medicaid. In some states for those making below a certain income, Medicaid will pay the beneficiaries' Part B premium for them (most beneficiaries have worked long enough and have no Part A premium), as well as some of their out of pocket medical and hospital expenses. In 2008, Medicare provided health care coverage for 45 million Americans.[21] Enrollment is expected to reach 78 million by 2030, when the baby-boom generation is fully enrolled.[ Medicare.com - Medicare Guide to Covered Products, Services ... Medicare.com is your gateway to Medicare covered products, services and information. Find covered equipment and supplies or learn how to qualify and enroll in Part D ... www.medicare.com - Cached Ohio Medicare Oh, Hi; Looking for Medicare in Ohio? We're here to help. ... Compare Medicare Plans Today and Find the Right Coverage for You www.ohio-medicare.com - Cached Medicare.org - A Senior Resource for Medicare and Healthcare ... News site template Joomla 2.5 for newspaper ... Original Medicare is one of your health coverage choices. You will have Original Medicare unless you choose to join a ... www.medicare.org - Cached Medicare.gov - Your Medicare Coverage This section of Medicare.gov provides information about Medicare coverage. www.medicare.gov/Coverage/Home.asp - Cached Medicare This booklet provides basic information about what Medicare is, who is covered and some of the options you have for choosing Medicare coverage. www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10043.html - Cached Part A covers inpatient hospital stays (at least overnight), including semiprivate room, food, and tests. Part A covers brief stays for convalescence in a skilled nursing facility if certain criteria are met: 1.A preceding hospital stay must be at least three days, three midnights, not counting the discharge date. 2.The nursing home stay must be for something diagnosed during the hospital stay or for the main cause of hospital stay. 3.If the patient is not receiving rehabilitation but has some other ailment that requires skilled nursing supervision then the nursing home stay would be covered. 4.The care being rendered by the nursing home must be skilled. Medicare part A does not pay for custodial, non-skilled, or long-term care activities, including activities of daily living (ADL) such as personal hygiene, cooking, cleaning, etc. The maximum length of stay that Medicare Part A will cover in a skilled nursing facility per ailment is 100 days. The first 20 days would be paid for in full by Medicare with the remaining 80 days requiring a co-payment (as of 2012, $144.50 per day). Many insurance companies have a provision for skilled nursing care in the policies they sell. The maximum length of stay that Medicare Part A will cover in a hospital inpatient stay is typically 90 days. The first 60 days would be paid for in full by Medicare. Days 61-90 require a co-payment (as of 2012, $289 per day). The beneficiary is also allocated "lifetime reserve days" that can be used after 90 days. These lifetime reserve days require a copayment (as of 2012, $578 per day), and the beneficiary can only use a total of 60 of these days throughout their lifetime.[22] If a beneficiary uses some portion of their Part A benefit and then goes at least 60 days without receiving facility-based skilled services, the 100-day clock is reset and the person qualifies for a new 100-day benefit period. Part B: Medical insurance Part B medical insurance helps pay for some services and products not covered by Part A, generally on an outpatient basis. Part B is optional and may be deferred if the beneficiary or his/her spouse is still working and has group health coverge through that employer. There is a lifetime penalty (10% per year) imposed for not enrolling in Part B unless actively working and receiving group health coverage from that employer. Part B coverage begins once a patient meets his or her deductible ($140 in 2012), then typically Medicare covers 80% of approved services, while the remaining 20% is paid by the patient.[23] Part B coverage includes physician and nursing services, x-rays, laboratory and diagnostic tests, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations, blood transfusions, renal dialysis, outpatient hospital procedures, limited ambulance transportation, immunosuppressive drugs for organ transplant recipients, chemotherapy, hormonal treatments such as Lupron, and other outpatient medical treatments administered in a doctor's office. Medication administration is covered under Part B if it is administered by the physician during an office visit. Part B also helps with durable medical equipment (DME), including canes, walkers, wheelchairs, and mobility scooters for those with mobility impairments. Prosthetic devices such as artificial limbs and breast prosthesis following mastectomy, as well as one pair of eyeglasses following cataract surgery, and oxygen for home use is also covered.[24] Complex rules are used to manage the benefit, and advisories are periodically issued which describe coverage criteria. On the national level these advisories are issued by CMS, and are known as National Coverage Determinations (NCD). Local Coverage Determinations (LCD) apply within the multi-state area managed by a specific regional Medicare Part B contractor, and Local Medical Review Policies (LMRP) were superseded by LCDs in 2003. Coverage information is also located in the CMS Internet-Only Manuals (IOM), the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), the Social Security Act, and the Federal Register. Index= 20 Title=retirement planning [] You'll regret it. Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but soon, and for the rest of your life." Those words, spoken on a tarmac at the finale of the classic film "Casablanca," could be stretched from the intended affairs of the heart to how we plan for retirement. There are financial decisions we make that seem a good idea at the time, retirement moves we make halfheartedly and needed plans we sweep under the carpet. When it comes to ensuring a lifetime of retirement income, bad decisions may not hurt immediately, but once the pain arrives it can last for decades. Retirement financial planning software Here are five retirement mistakes that will haunt you, and ways to avoid the haunting entirely: 1. Guesswork, not legwork How much will you need to retire? That straightforward question should be a starting point for people of all ages, at all stages of planning. A great number of people, however, do no more than guess at what they should save. Is retirement a thing of the past? Retirement worries? Money expert Amey Stone answers top questions According to the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, a nonprofit organization funded by Transamerica Life Insurance, half of workers continue to guess at the amount of money they need to save to feel financially secure when they retire, and a large number (44%) of American workers do not have a strategy to reach their retirement goals. Of those who do have a strategy, only half have factored in health care costs and one-fifth have factored in long-term care insurance, so their estimates can be inadequate. A reduction or loss of Social Security benefits ranks third in greatest retirement fears. As part of its research, Allianz Life asked a segment of baby boomers how much money they thought they would need to live on. "The average number they came up with was $60,000," says Katie Libbe, vice president of Consumer Insights for Allianz Life. "Then we asked them to try to calculate what that means in terms of a portfolio that's going to deliver that for as long as they think they are going to be in retirement. They were at a loss in terms of what they would need. "They said $500,000 when, if you just apply a 4% withdrawal to that portfolio, they would really need $1.5 million," Libbe said. "They don't know how to do even this basic calculation. You can teach them about some of these individual tactical mistakes, but they can be off even in the strategic sense of how much money needs to be socked away." Not only is there the danger of not ensuring the longevity of your savings; there is also the temptation of being unreasonably aggressive with your portfolio to make up for not saving as much as you should have. (Are you saving enough for retirement? Use this MSN Money calculator to find out.) Health care costs also need to be considered. According to research by Allianz Life, the average couple retiring at age 65 will spend approximately $285,000 in health care costs in retirement. As life expectancies continue to increase, baby boomers need to have a plan for covering some portion of managed care for an elderly parent as well as for themselves. Health care costs, Libbe says, could "eat into a good chunk of their nondiscretionary dollars, which means fewer dollars available for all the fun things they want to do in retirement." 2. 'I'll just keep working' Most people assume they will retire at a certain age, and many look to salvage inadequate savings by working later into life. But according to Limra, a global association of insurance and financial services companies, two in five people retire earlier than planned due to a number of factors, including layoffs or illness. For those assuming they will work part time in retirement, many can't due to circumstances beyond their control. . "We did some research recently where we found out that a lot more baby boomers are planning to work longer," Libbe says. "That's basically their backup plan for not having saved enough for retirement. The Limra statistic about two in five people retiring earlier than they expected just shows you can't count on working longer being your plan." Making the prospect of retiring ahead of schedule all the more precarious is that 70% of respondents to the Transamerica Center survey agreed they could work until age 65 and still not have enough money saved to meet their retirement needs. "Planning not to retire is simply not a viable retirement strategy," says Catherine Collinson, the president of the center. "Planning to work past age 65 is an important opportunity to continue earning income, save more and help to alleviate a retirement savings shortfall. However, it's important that workers be proactive in setting a retirement savings goal, saving and investing for retirement and having a backup plan if they are forced to retire sooner than expected." retirement calculator retirement plans retirement party ideas retirement party planning roth ira Also try:retirement planning calculator,axaonline annuities retirement planning, retirement planning guide, retirement planning software, retirement planning advice 2010, retirement planning tools, american funds retirement planning center, early retirement planning, retirement planning worksheet, chartered retirement planning counselor more....Sponsored ResultsRetirement Day One Watch A Video On This Individual's Day One Of Retirement. dayonestories.com Planning for Retirement? Learn how to plan for retirement. Fidelity Investments can help. www.fidelity.com T. Rowe Price Roth IRA Do Something Different with Your Roth IRA. Invest in Low Cost Funds. www.TRowePrice.com Retirement Planning How Much Do You Need To Retire? We Can Help You Plan For Retirement. www.MerrillEdge.com More Sponsors:retirement planning, roth ira, retirement community, retirementSearch resultsRetirement Planning and Savings Plans - Retirement Calculator ... Retirement planning strategies and retirement advice, including retirement calculators to help you retire faster, 401k tips and more. money.cnn.com/retirement - Cached More results from money.cnn.com » SmartMoney Retirement Planner - SmartMoney.com Whether you're in retirement, close to it, or just dreaming about it, The SmartMoney Retirement Planner helps you see how working, saving and spending decisions can ... www.smartmoney.com/retirement/planner - Cached More results from smartmoney.com » Toledo Investment Advisor | Toledo Retirement Planner Toledo's most trusted Financial Advisors and Retirement Specialists. ... Comprehensive Planning Estate Planning Life Insurance Ohio 529 ... toledoretirement.com - Cached Retirement Planner: Plan For Your Retirement A secure, comfortable retirement is every worker's dream. And now because we're living longer, healthier lives, we can expect to spend more time in retirement than ... www.ssa.gov/retire2 - Cached More results from ssa.gov » Retirement Planning Toledo Ohio - Beacon Associates Beacon Associates has years of experience in helping Toledo Ohio area residents with identifying their retirement planning goals and determining the path to getting ... www.beaconhealthquote.com/retirement-plan.php - Cached Retirement Planning - Learn How to Build Your Ideal ... Information, tips and advice to help you get started planning for retirement. retireplan.about.com - Cached Toledo Retirement Planning Service - Find BBB Accredited ... Find BBB Accredited Retirement Planners near Toledo, OH - your guide to trusted Toledo, OH Retirement Planners, recommended and BBB Accredited businesses. www.bbb.org/.../retirement-planning-service/toledo-oh - Cached More results from bbb.org » Yahoo! Finance - Personal Finance | Retirement Self-employment Retirement Plan Maximum Contribution calculator; How much can I contribute to my IRA? Should I convert to a Roth IRA? Compare a Roth 401(k) to a ... finance.yahoo.com/retirement - Cached Retirement Planning, Guidance and Tools - Fidelity Fidelity helps you prepare for retirement with retirement income planning resources and tools. www.fidelity.com/retirement/planning - Cached More results from fidelity.com » Taking The Mystery Out Of Retirement Planning Taking The Mystery Out Of Retirement Planning. Printer Friendly Version; en español; Table Of Contents Chapter 1 - Tracking Down Today's Money www.dol.gov/ebsa/publications/nearretirement.html - Cached Sponsored ResultsRetirement Day One Watch A Video On This Individual's Day One Of Retirement. dayonestories.com Planning for Retirement? Learn how to plan for retirement. Fidelity Investments can help. www.fidelity.com T. Rowe Price Roth IRA Do Something Different with Your Roth IRA. Invest in Low Cost Funds. www.TRowePrice.com Retirement Planning How Much Do You Need To Retire? We Can Help You Plan For Retirement. www.MerrillEdge.com More Sponsors:retirement planning, roth ira, retirement community, retirement, retirement giftsSponsored Results Retirement Planning Help Edward Jones® Financial Advisors Can Help Build Your Retirement Plan www.EdwardJones.com Wealth Management Personalized, Global Investing - EverBank Wealth Management, Inc. EverBankWealthManagement.com Wells Fargo Advisors Know Your 401(k) Rollover Options. Free Retirement Guide. Learn More! www.WellsFargoAdvisorsInfo.com Top 5 Roth IRAs Looking To Open A Roth IRA? Don't Wait. Open A Roth IRA Now! GreenGroveRetirement.com DC Retirement Homes Find Quality Senior Care. Get Started With Free Consulation www.Care.com/SeniorCare Retirement Communities Sunrise Senior Living Official Site Find Your Loved Ones Care Near You. www.SunriseSeniorLiving.com More Sponsors:retirement planning roth ira retirement community retirement retirement gifts 401k rollover See your message here... . Retirement planning related searches: retirement planning calculator retirement plans free retirement planning calculator roth ira retirement planning guide social security retirement calculator retirement retirement party ideas Index= 20 Title=Cancel Cable. [] Digital broadcast TV is an improved method of TV broadcasting which offers cable TV picture quality and additional channels for free over the airwaves. In June 2009, TV stations in the US switched over to this new standard, however most stations have already started digital broadcasting. What’s in it for you? 1. First of all, it’s free. Unlike cable, there are no monthly fees (even for HD broadcasts) 2. Quality. If you are in range and can receive a digital channel, reception is typically perfect. No snow, grainyness or fiddling around with rabbit ears to get the perfect picture. Since digital broadcast TV is less compressed than many digital cable signals, quality can actually be much better than traditional cable TV. 3. Additional network channels. Since digital broadcast is more efficient, networks have the ability to broadcast multiple channels. For example, a local PBS affiliate can choose to provide 3 channels round the clock. - one for small children, one for older kids and one for adults. (This was a nice surprise, since we found many new kids shows that we couldn’t pick up before going digital). What equipment do I need? You can use any type of TV to receive digital broadcasts, even that old one with the rabbit ears you got for $20 at a garage sale. LCD and Plasma TV owners: There is a good chance that your TV’s can already receive digital broadcast TV. If your manual says ATSC tuner or HD ready, you can just plug your antenna directly into your tv and start receiving free digital tv broadcasts, many of them in HD. Everyone else: You will need a digital TV receiver to enable your ‘old’ TV to work with digital broadcast TV. This device looks and acts like a small cable box and plugs into your TV set. These boxes sell new for about $40, but can sometimes be purchased for under $20. Here’s a picture of the one we are using, a Zenith DTT900 which cost $19 at Circuit City… Digital Converter Box You’ll also need an antenna to receive digital broadcasts. You will probably want to buy a low cost set top UHF/VHF Antenna. After reading many online reviews, we picked up this one at Radio Shack for $16 and have been very pleased with its performance… A simple set top antenna Note: If you are very far away from most transmitters (30-70 miles), you may need to pickup something more powerful. The good news is than even top of the line long range antennas usually cost less than you would spend for two months of cable service. Next: Check availability in your area. 34 comments ? #1Denny Duplessis on 09.16.08 at 12:07 pm Greetings cancelcable.com, All I can say is WOW! Nice job laying the facts out so everyone can understand how great over the air digital TV reception really is. I am placing a link on our website back to Cancel Cable.com on our TV antenna page at http://www.dennysantennaservice.com/1136892.html Keep up the good work! Take Care Denny Duplessis TV Antenna Source “Helping America Watch Free TV” .#2admin on 09.19.08 at 8:02 am Thanks Denny! .#3Snacking and canceling cable — CancelCable.com on 11.17.08 at 6:54 am [...] What? [...] .#4Preparing for the February 17th digital switchover — CancelCable.com on 12.10.08 at 5:04 am [...] What? [...] .#5no on 01.02.09 at 10:23 am Wow so I can get 20 channels instead of paying a monthly fee for about 100 channels which about 50 of them are HD. .#6outdoor antenna on 01.03.09 at 2:37 pm Great info here! I am willing to say that over 90% of pay TV provider customers don’t know they are being charged $10-$15/month EXTRA for their local channels when they can get them for free AND receive them better due to using a DTV antenna and getting those channels in a “true” uncompressed signal! .#7Gene on 01.08.09 at 5:36 pm Very well done website. Easy to navigate. The pictures are most helpful to those of us that aren’t hardware savvy. .#8lorenzo on 02.03.09 at 10:46 pm Thanks for all the valuable info…I’ve been searching to an alternative to satelite dish that’s affordable, thanks to you and your suggestions I know we’ll be able to save $$$! .#9Don on 02.17.09 at 7:10 pm Can any one tell me how to hook up my legacy 12 year old Proscan 36 inch TV? It doesn’t have a VGA connector but it does have RCA connectors. Later we’re going to upgrade to an LCD TV? Do I string a super long VGA cable from my laptop to the LCD TV when we get it? The Proscan has an S-video input. .#10Digital TV transition 6/12/09 - are you ready? — CancelCable.com on 06.11.09 at 12:51 pm [...] What? [...] .#11Benson on 01.20.10 at 1:19 pm I’m a computer geek, and no doubt ahead of the curve, but I cancelled my cable service abut two years ago. Mostly for the following reasons: 1. I save lots of money. Cable prices are ridiculous! I could see maybe $30-$40 dollars a month, but there are people paying $100+ 2. I’m happy with the the channels I get for free. I find if I do so desire to “fiddle with my rabbit ears,” I get even more channels. I live right in the Jersey Suburbs of NYC, so I can pick up NJ and NY channels. 3. The picture quality of broadcast hi-def, *Cleans cable’s clock.* Period. No comparison. “Cable hi-def” looks like fuzzy, grainy, crap compared to broadcast 1080i hi-def. 4. I have a Sony Vaio laptop with a beautiful screen for playing online movies and watching shows online. I also bought a VGA cable, since my flatscreen TV has a VGA/PC input. In this case, I can output movies from my laptop, to my TV screen. .#12Margo on 01.26.10 at 8:42 am The only way I can receive cable television is through a satellite carrier because I live in a rural area. Does this affect any of the information and/or links that I have perused prior to writing this question? I invite feedback from anyone who has cancelled their satellite service and is still able to watch their favorite shows in HD. I find that I have to pay for so many channels that I have never watched in order to watch the few that I really enjoy. This would be a fabulous alternative especially as I am disabled and every dime I save would help my husband to work less. Will check back to see if their are any postings. Hardware and Services The first thing to do when cutting the cord is list the shows you watch regularly, and your favorite TV channels. Next, do a little online research to find out whether those shows appear on the channel's streaming sites (such as NBC.com, CBS.com, etc.) or on Hulu or YouTube. Many shows on pay channels such as HBO don't appear until much later, and usually must be bought via a service such as iTunes. In addition to what's available online, you might be surprised at the quality of over-the-air broadcast channels since the digital switch-over last year. Many newer TVs only require an antenna to get local broadcast channels, while older TVs need a converter box, which runs from $40 to $80. Plus, some of the programming includes HD content. To find out which digital channels you can get over the airwaves, input your location at the AntennaWeb site. (Note: Broadcasters recently announced at CES that they would be offering "mobile DTV" so that people could pick up digital broadcast TV on laptops, smartphones and tablets.) Below is a rundown of some of the more important elements to enjoying TV content via the web. You won't need to get all of them but you can mix and match those that will get you what you need. Most cable quitters find they can get about 95 percent of the TV content they used to watch on cable via the various services below. Hardware Roku This is the box most cable quitters seem to like. It connects to your TV and your computer network, let's you watch Netflix streaming movies, and offers some free and pay options for additional content. It costs $79.99 for SD and $99.99 for an HD model. AppleTV It's basically a front-end device to iTunes, letting you download movies and music and play them through your TV. Problem: No TV tuner or DVR functionality. Digital converter box If you want to get the digital over-the-air stations in your area, you'll likely need an antenna for newer TVs or this box for older TVs. Cost: $40 to $80. Have I missed any important elements to cutting the cord? Have you cut the cord and if so, what's your setup? Share your thoughts in the comments below, and I'll update my story with any gear or services I missed. UPDATE: There has been a lot of commentary on this story when it was linked on the PBS Facebook page. I thought it was worth addressing a few of those comments here: > Michael Lindemann said, "Interesting that no one mentions cable Internet access as being an upshot to cable access. Interesting article, but it misses at least one key point: The fastest and most reliable way to get home Internet access is through the cable company! In my area, the cable Internet subscription is bundled with the cable service at a discount." That's true. For many people who cut the cord to cable TV, they still are likely to end up paying for Internet service from the cable company. Prashant Shah said, "The missing option in the article is the public library, where I've always found not-so-recent shows. Newer shows you need to wait a bit, but then I'm in no hurry." True enough. The public library in many communities offers up free borrowing of TV shows and movies on DVD. The selection can vary from library to library, but the price is right: free, as long as you return them on time.